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Burning of the Devil

THE BURNING OF THE DEVIL

On December 7 was the traditional "Burning of the Devil (Quema del Diablo)". Usually is done in front of "La Fuente de la Concepción" which is located between two gas stations. But this year, to avoid any accidents, the devil was set on fire farther up in 4th street Oriente. It has been a tradition to burn the devil and have a big feast to begin the Holiday cheer. There is live music and all types of food in "Calle de la Concepción" to give people a nice night to walk around and have fun. 

We had the opportunity to watch everything since all the planning began because of the school's location right in front of the fountain in Calle de la Concepción, it was great to be part of the festivity. 

 

Sumpango Kite Festival

 

 

The November group of students of Academia Colonial had the opportunity to watch and enjoy the Sumpango Kite Festival 2010. A traditional festivity celebrated on November 1st every year on what is called "the day of the dead" (Día de los muertos). It was a fun and cultural experience in Sumpango, the kites had very interesting messages written on them, some about learning experiences of life others about the after life. It was amazing to see how much work it takes to finish the kites and to look at them fly.

Students also had a tour to the cemetery and saw how family members get together and honor their loved ones with flowers, food and decoration. 

 

   

Alliance with NGO Niños de Guatemala

Ninos de Guatemala and Academia Colonial Spanish School 

Academia Colonial is excited to announce that it has entered into a cooperation with Niños de Guatemala, a well respected NGO (non-governmental organization) based in Guatemala and the Netherlands. The organization is firmly committed to improving Guatemala through education, specifically giving impoverished children access to education that would not ordinarily be available to them. The harsh reality is that their students, if it were not for them being enrolled in school, would be working or wandering the streets exposed to the danger of gang membership. Responding to this great need, Niños de Guatemala opened their school Nuestro Futuro in Ciudad Vieja in 2009 where they are currently teaching 100 students and plan to grow enrollment to more than 200 students within four years.

In the agreement, Academia Colonial donates to Niños de Guatemala a percentage of all revenues received for Spanish lessons while Niños de Guatemala recommends our Spanish school to their volunteers that need Spanish lessons and home stays before working with the children at Nuestro Futuro.

We are happy to say that every student that studies at Academia Colonial is directly benefiting the efforts of Niños de Guatemala. For more details or volunteer opportunities please stop by the Niños de Guatemala Antigua volunteer center, now located in our offices in Casa Convento Concepción, or visit the NdG Website.

 

   

Rotary Club of Antigua's MotoPoker Fundraiser


The Rotary Club of Antigua hosted its annual MotoPoker event Saturday with over 230 participants from Guatemala, Mexico, and Salvador. The event is not a race, but rather a tour for motorcycle enthusiasts beginning in Guatemala city, running through el mirador de Santa Elena Barillas, Asiole, Esquintla, and ending with a breakfast at Santo Domingo el Cerro. At each check point the participants receive a poker card, and at the end those with the best hands win the big prizes. Thanks however to many donations from businesses in Antigua and Guatemala City, no one left empty handed. The event was a huge success raising money to support the Antigua Rotary Club's scholarship program for children in need. 

   

Students Volunteer for From Houses to Homes

Two of our Dutch students, Daan and Regina, spent the afternoon helping an organization called From Houses to Homes. The project which was founded in 2004 by New Jersey Native Joe Collins, has improved the lives of thousands of Guatemalan's by providing new homes and, therefore, better living conditions for some of the country's poorest inhabitants.   

 

 

 

 

   

Students Climb Volcano Pacaya

A short 30 minute drive from Antigua, Pacaya is one of thirty-three volcanoes in Guatemala but one of only a few active ones. The hike is about two hours up and an hour and a half down with spectacular views of the surrounding country side, complete with an amazing sunset. Depending on the day as lava flow varies, the adventure gives you an opportunity to see lava up close and even cook on the hot lava rocks. Pictured is one of our students Andrew from Atlanta Georgia who came to study Spanish with us during his spring break.

 

 

   

Cooking Class Activity at el Frijol Feliz Cooking School

Frijol Feliz Cooking School Antigua Guatemala

Louise, Sarah, and our Spanish instructor Soledad making tortillias today at el Frijol Feliz cooking school where our students have a weekly cooking class. Today's menu was pepian de pollo (quite possibly Guatemala's most famous dish), guacamole, tortillas, and rellenitos!   

   

Break Time

A few of our teachers Paolo, Miriam, and Soledad relaxing during break time, enjoying the nice weather. Actually the weather's nice ninety percent of the time! 

   

Student Volunteer

Student Volunteer

Jasmin one of our Australian students studies Spanish in the morning and works in the afternoons for Project Seres, an environmental volunteer project based here in Guatemala.

   

We've Moved!

Academia Colonial Spanish School Antigua Guatemala Casa Convento Concepcion

We’ve moved! Academia Colonial is now located inside of Casa Convento Concepción, a very beautiful and historical building which was, back in the Colonial era, Antigua’s oldest convent dating back to 1578. Antigua which was itself founded in 1543 was well on its way to becoming the most prominent city in Central America being the seat of Spanish power in Central America. At that time Antigua was home to massive mansions, churches, and monasteries, most notably the Franciscan and Dominicans orders. Antigua however lacked a convent. It was then in 1578 that four nuns came down from Mexico, founded the Conception order and began construction of the convent and church. The first phase of construction took 50 years, but then it was expanded and deemed complete in 1694. The convent was then badly damaged in the earthquake of 1717 and then subsequently rebuilt in 1729 to a grander scale covering two square blocks and featured over twenty fountains in the interior spaces.

Unfortunately earthquakes stuck again in 1773 leaving everything in ruins. It wasn't until 2004 that much of the convent and cloister were rebuilt. 

 

 

   

School Cookout at JP's RumBar

Academia Colonial Student Cookout at JP's RumBar

It was a beautiful Friday afternoon for a school party at JP's RumBar. We cooked fried shrimp po’boys, a New Orleans style French bread sandwich, steak fajitas, and enjoyed some cold Gallos (our national beer). The teachers were laughing that the po’boys reminded them of a Guatemalan sandwich called a “shuco” which is slang for dirty or in this case messy. Nonetheless they were a big hit. The students had a great time cooking!